Frequently Asked Questions

I have a Jack London first edition (or original photograph, letter, etc.) What is it worth? If I want to sell it, where should I go?

With regard to First editions, be aware many of Jack's books went into later editions. Read the copyright page carefully to be certain it is the actual first. The most valuable first editions have their paper book jackets. The Macmillan books in particular with their gilded cover markings are beautiful examples of the publishing craft. A book's value is affected partly by the number of copies produced. A first of The Call of the Wild will not be as valuable as The Kempton-Wace Letters. Complicating the situation even more, shortly after his death a family member took to 'rubber stamping' his signature on first edition books to increase their value (at the publishers request). Whilst these aren't authentic, they do not completely spoil a book's value. For example, the 1917 edition of The Human Drift (MacMillan) was published three years after Jack London's death, and 'signed' by him.

A good reference book is Jack London First Editions by James E. Sisson and Robert Martens.

If you want to sell your books or private papers and photographs relating to Jack London, consult with a book and manuscript auction house in a major city, such as New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, London, or San Francisco. There is a strong market for top quality material.

If your book is not in prime condition, not a first, or a reprint by Grolier's, you may find auction house catalogs useful for estimating a fair lesser value to sell the book to a dealer or by yourself.

Where is the poem that says something about "I'd rather be ashes than dust" or something about being a meteor?

I would rather that my spark should burn out
    in a brilliant blaze than it should be stifled by dry-rot.
I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom
    of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet.
The function of man is to live, not to exist.
I shall not waste my days trying to prolong them.
I shall use my time.

Did Jack London actually write these words?  No extant copy is available in his own handwriting or in any of his publications.

The source above comes from a book edited by Irving Shepard, Jack London's Tales of Adventure (New York: Doubleday, 1956), p. vii.  Shepard was London's literary executor following Charmian London's death.  He had grown up on the ranch, having been the only son of Jack's stepsister, Eliza London Shepard.

A more contemporary source appeared in a news article which may have been Shepard's source.  Journalist Ernest J. Hopkins had visited the ranch just weeks before London's death, and reported the following in the San Francisco Bulletin, 2 December 1916:

"'I would rather be ashes than [sic] said Jack London not two months before his death, to a group of friends with whom he was discussing, as he loved to discuss, the eternal problems of life and living.

'I would rather be ashes than dust.'  The words, with their strange double significance, are now recalled with emotion by those friends.  When he made that striking summary of his personal philosophy, London was marvelously alive.  He irradiated vigor.  Every breath that he drew was to him a brilliant sensation.  Every moment of his time was crammed with events.  he was in love with life--an[d] with vitality--ablaze with the joy and the poignancy and the overwhelming interest of "The Game."

Let there be no misunderstanding of his phrase.  Jack London did not mean to say that, after death, he would prefer the ashes of cremation to the dust of ordinary burial.  Nothing was further from him than the thought that he himself was, as he put it, soon to 'go into the silence.'  Of all the ardent group that heard him on that occasion, he was the most alive. Beside him all other men seemed colorless.   But he was talking about life, not about death.  He was giving his law of conduct, not his preference in funeral customs.

'I would rather be ashes than dust.  I would rather that my spark should burn out in a brilliant blaze than that it should be stifled by dry-rot.  I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet.  The proper function of man is to LIVE.  I shall not waste my days trying to prolong them.  I shall use my time.'

'I would rather be ashes than dust.'  In those words London perfectly expressed himself.  Never content to do his thinking by halves, upon that instinct for supreme activity he constructed a philosophy that was consistent, if unusual.  Absorbed in today, he could not envisage a hereafter.  Enthusiastic over tangible facts and present sensations, he believed that ease was cowardice; that the stronger must over conquer the weaker;  that intellectuality divorced from action was wasted an futile;  that man and the animals were of one nature, man having no quality that was not rudimentarily present in horses and dogs; that after death the human being was 'just meat.'  Amid these tangible ideas there was room for race-memories, but not for superstitions.  There was room for violent work, intense play, fierce fighting, mad adventure, thoughtful planning, but not for pretty dreaming,  not for dogma, not for detached theorization.  His thought was essentially practical...."

The question London scholars have is whether these words are all London's and as he expressed them.  Moreso than today quotes were unreliable or even sheer  inventions.  The full passage has many marks of London's style--its directness, its rhythm, its diction--to persuade that it is authentic.

That all was not Hopkins' invention can be found further in one document in London's own handwriting.  While visiting Australian suffragette Vida Goldstein  in Melbourne, he placed the following in her  Autograph Book.  (The book is owned by a private collector who provided a photocopy of the page.)

Dear Miss Goldstein:--
Seven years ago I wrote you that I'd rather be ashes than dust.  I still subscribe to that sentiment.
Sincerely yours,
Jack London
Jan. 13, 1909

This is a tantalizing clue that he did compose some statement in the form of the Credo, but it is far from complete.  Until new evidence appears, the only words a scrupulous historian would attribute to Jack London with certainty are "I would rather be ashes than dust."

Did London commit suicide? (Several books and encyclopedia state that he did.)

This claim was made by London's good friend George Sterling, and was published by Irving Stone in Sailor on Horseback in 1938. Consequently, the point was made in enough later books and reference articles that it was accepted as true. In later years, scholars debated the point, and a pharmacologist, Alfred Shivers, wrote an essay disputing Stone's evidence. Most agree that he was mortally ill around the time of his death. Whether he may have taken a dose of morphine or not, and whether he accidentally overdosed, is still under discussion.
"No Suicide" by Reinhard Wissdorf includes his correspondence with Encarta regarding this point. Read it for a good informal introduction to these points.
For a more recent view, read this article by Earle Labor.

HELP! I have a paper due. I need to find literary criticism on The Call of the Wild (or any of London's writings)?

Many libraries have noncirculating guides in their reference sections. See, for example, Twentieth Century Literary Criticism. Ask the reference librarian for help. They welcome questions, and will know what is readily available to help you.

If you are a college student, your library will have key literary criticism journals. We like this resource from New York University.

Finally, if you are having trouble, let your teacher know. He or she may not realize how difficult it is to find literary criticism at your local library.

Where is Jack London's essay on "The Scab," which has been quoted in various labor actions?

This essay is more complex than one would suppose from the title. It was a speech later published in  the Atlantic magazine, and in a collection of essays, The War of the Classes Here he discusses capitalist scabs, and the United States economy as a scab in relation to other nations. You may find that the quote you have is not in this essay, because the late James Sisson III determined that some of the statements regarding scabs attributed to London actually come from other sources.

Here are the opening paragraphs:

"In a competitive society, where men struggle with one another for food and shelter, what is more natural than that generosity, when it diminishes the food and shelter of men other than he who is generous, should be held an accursed thing? Wise old saws to the contrary, he who takes from a man's purse takes from his existence. To strike at a man's food and shelter is to strike at his life, and in a society organized on a tooth-and-nail basis, such an act, performed though it may be under the guise of generosity, is none the less menacing and terrible.

It is for this reason that a laborer is so fiercely hostile to another laborer who offers to work for less pay or longer hours. To hold his place (which is to live), he must offset this offer by another equally liberal, which is equivalent to giving away somewhat from the food and shelter he enjoys. To sell his day's work for two dollars instead of two dollars and a half means that he, his wife, and his children will not have so good a roof over their heads, such warm clothes on their backs, such substantial food in their stomachs. Meat will be bought less frequently, and it will be tougher and less nutritious; stout new shoes will go less often on the children's feet; and disease and death will be more imminent in a cheaper house and neighborhood."